Based in Chicago, IL. In Her Life is a blog by Amber Snearl. Her posts explore modern ideals of success, politics, personal experiences as a POC, feminism and everyday life.

Being Afro-Latina is A Thing & I’m Glad We’re Talking About It

Being Afro-Latina is A Thing & I’m Glad We’re Talking About It

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Wassup y'all , Y'all feeling alright? Yea?

Y'all cool? Ok, cool.

So...

Y'all know that I stopped watching love and hip hop, because of the mind numbing stereotypical content and all... but I did catch wind of the newest cast member to Miami's show. A beautiful, full-figured, Afro sporting, chocolate skin having, Spanish speaking, Dominican beauty by the name of Amara La Negra.

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Beautiful, right?

Having the mindset that I have, a few people put me on to her 60ish seconds of triumph on the screen as she tore down the stereotypes surrounding Afros and elegance. (You can catch that scene here)

That scene? I loved it. Still won't watch the show, but I loved it.

Within her powerful words were those of self identification. She identified as an Afro-Latina. Now, this isn't the first time I've heard this and I'm overjoyed that it won't be the last...but I have also heard the backlash, the confusion and the misconception about using this term.

I'm glad that Amara did this. I'm glad she took her platform and created a voice for herself and used that voice on national television.

I'm glad because many of us don't realize, don't recognize that we're ALL black (we're = inclusive) but we are literally..all..black.

We just come from different places.

You see...

Black.

Black is a term used to cover and include all brown skinned people. It's a term that I, an "American" woman, unfortunately unaware of her ancestry and roots can consider herself to identify with what she is seen as by the masses. It's a way to say, aye...I've got big thick hair, pretty brown skin, a wide nose and some full and plump lips so that makes me black.

Not African-American.

Just black.

This is why I love that the term Afro-Latina is being used as an identifier.

To identify with being black is to identify as one. It's to confront and not shy away from how a darker skinned Latina woman with a fro and black features can understand what it is to consciously identify herself.

It's saying, yes, you have Latin roots, but you also have black idenitfiers. It's saying I won't forget about one part of me just because the other is where I originated.

We're all here.

Brought here for some. Came here for others.

Yet here nonetheless.

Think of it this way,

If the ways of Jim Crow came back and we all stood in line to be subjected to the paper bag? Y'all know there'd be no separation? Right?...

Right?

Afro. Africa. African.

It's all relative.

There's a reason skin tones evolved the way that they did.

Dialects

Features

Hair textures

Figures

Cultures

Natures

Ya know?

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